How Long Will My New Dentures Hurt?

If you are experiencing problems getting used to wearing your new dentures, we urge you to not be alarmed. Anytime you put something in your mouth that doesn’t naturally belong in your mouth, you can expect to experience a little discomfort. It’s normal. It’s also something that will pass with time as your mouth and your mind adjust to having new teeth.

How long can you expect to experience a little pain and discomfort from your new dentures? While the time it takes people to adjust to having new teeth may vary from one person to the next, you can expect it to take you a month or two before the pain and irritation you are experiencing subsidies.

If you want to mitigate the pain and discomfort as much as possible, there are a few things you can do. In the sections below, we want to discuss denture pain and how you can use tried and true methods to help mediate your gum pain.

Why Do My New Dentures Hurt?

Remember, your guns are very sensitive. The fact you have put a foreign object made of foreign materials in your mouth is no small thing. What you have to understand and accept is denture problems are very common.

Hopefully, the pain and discomfort you are experiencing is manageable. It’s likely happening for a couple of reasons.

First, the primary source of the irritation is likely coming the fact your dentures have not yet settled in your mouth. They are probably moving about against your gums when you talk and eat, which is understandably uncomfortable.

Read More: Why Are My Dentures Making Me Gag?

Over time, the muscle memory in and around your mouth will eventually figure out how to keep your dentures positioned where they need to be. That’s when pain issues should subside. If not, you need to contact your dentist about possible fitting issues.

The second issue you may be facing is figuring out how to properly chew food. This could really be a challenge if your dentures are moving about while you chew. This is a common problem, especially as it relates to bottom dentures.

You also need to be wary of getting food particles under your dentures. Such particles could quickly become an real big source of pain, especially if the rubbing and movement causes sores that can lead to infections.

Home Remedies I Can Use To Help With The Pain

For the most part, it’s your gums that are taking the brunt of the irritation that is turning into pain. With this in mind, there are a few medicinal and home remedies you might try to keep your gums feeling healthy. Here are a few options you might want to consider:

  • Use some kind of denture adhesive to help hold your dentures in place
  • Try chewing food slowly and softly, especially in the first couple of weeks after you get your dentures. This will allow your gums more time to heal
  • Be sure to gargle with warm saltwater several times a day. Salt is a natural healing remedy
  • Dab a little bourbon/whiskey on your gums for temporary pain relief

Any remedy you might want to try should be considered a temporary solution. As you get used to talking and chewing with your new dentures in place, there will eventually come a time when you will forget you are wearing dentures.

Until that time arrives, the best thing for you to do is concentrate on is taking good care of your dentures. Here are some suggestions about dental hygiene with dentures:

  • Don’t wear your dentures to bed. Instead, soak your dentures in a denture cleansing solution overnight
  • Clean and rinse your dentures before placing them in your mouth each day
  • Use a soft-bristled tested brush or a special denture-cleaning brush as recommended by your dentist
  • Never use toothpaste or household cleansing products to clean your teeth. You can use plain and simple soap and warm water or a dentist recommended denture cleanser

Keeping your dentures and mouth clean at all times will help to alleviate pain issues.

When To See My Dentist For Pain With My Dentures

When you first get your dentures, you can expect to visit your dentist in the succeeding weeks. They will want you to come in for some minor adjustments to the fit of the dentures in your mouth. Keeping these appointments is important if you want the best chances of avoiding problems. Otherwise, you shouldn’t need to see your dentist unless you start experiencing pain and discomfort.

Temporary pain and discomfort from new dentures is to be expected. If your pain and discomfort were to persist for more than a month or two, there could be a problem. If your pain and discomfort lasts too long or becomes too intense, you need to see your dentist immediately. All indications would likely be pointing to the possibility you have an infection brought on by sores or bacteria under your dentures.

In Conclusion

Hopefully, the above information will serve to improve your awareness about pain issues related to the wearing of new dentures. As long as you manage all the minor issues, you will likely be able to avoid the major ones. Over time, your dentures will become a normal part of your being.